Peer Response Post: The Peer Response Post is the response you’ll submit to a cl


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Peer Response Post: The Peer Response Post is the response you’ll submit to a classmate’s Original Post. Your response should go beyond simple agreement, and should provide additional perspective, personal connection, respectful disagreement, follow-up question, etc. in order to push thinking and encourage discussion.
Length: At least 200 words. It’s recommended that you write your post in programs like Google Doc, Microsoft Word, Mac Pages, etc. so you can get an accurate word count and complete a spell check before officially submitting.
Reading Citations: Citations are not required, but if you feel as though a citation would enhance your response, you’re free to do so.
Formality: This can be more conversational than a formal essay, however remember structure and conventions are important. Readers should be able to follow your line of logic through your post’s structure. Readers should not struggle to understand your meaning because language is too colloquial. Think more “blog post” than “text with friends.”
Please respond to this post:
Convergent Thinking:
In reading the Technical Assistance Bulletin on Trauma Informed Classrooms, I felt a reinforcement of my pre-existing beliefs that trauma in students, even when experienced outside the classroom, can have a deep and meaningful impact on the students’ learning and capacity to retain new information.
When a classroom is aware of the impact that trauma can have on students in a classroom, certain triggers can be reasonably avoided to prevent stress responses that impede learning. I was not previously aware of the degree to which trauma presents in a physiological manner before doing this reading, as “Prior to experiencing a traumatic event, our bodies naturally respond to stress by activating a series of physiological events that are intended to keep us safe.” (NCJFCJ, p.4) In this way, trauma is not just a physiological event that happens to people who experience disturbing events, but rather a chain reaction of our own bodies engaging in its own protection.
Additionally, I feel that being aware of the trauma’s impact on the brain during a learning process can help educators form a curriculum around students that are particularly at risk of going off task due to their own experiences outside of the school setting. In the same way teachers can set the pace and tone of a classroom, they can also set the emotional tone- one that can acknowledge nonverbally a student’s level of comfort so that they may feel psychologically safe, and therefore most prepared to learn to the best of their ability.
However, moderating a trauma-informed classroom does not have to be without discipline or cater to one specific student or group of students. According to the text “Trauma can make a student feel powerless and cause hypersensitivity to threat, such as a teacher correcting him or a belief that the teacher feels the student is a bad person who deserves only punishment. (NCJFCJ, p.15) The previous topics for this reading assert that trauma creates distortion of reality, which feeds into a situation of distorted discipline. Creating gentle but firm boundaries and changing the student’s perspective on this matter can help them feel less cornered, and less apt to trigger their flight or fight reflexes, which is conducive to learning in both the short and long run.
Works Cited:
ISAIAH B. PICKENS, PH.D., NICOLE TSCHOPP, LCSW-C, Trauma-Informed Classrooms, 2017. Reno, NV. pp. 1-25

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